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Case Studies

The Vigil (dir. Keith Thomas, 2020)

It might not be perfect, but Keith Thomas’ The Vigil is a fresh, exciting new entry into the Jewish horror genre – and throws down a much-needed gauntlet for other creators

“Since the birth of the horror genre, especially its occult and supernatural sub-genres, Christianity has had the market fairly cornered. Rife with ubiquitous symbolism and substantial lore to draw upon, horror writers have had plenty to keep them occupied, with the devil and exorcisms being only the tip of the iceberg. Even when writers don’t engage with the religion behind the imagery, allusions are typically enough, with theology twisted to fit whatever the horror demands. Unfortunately, these religious horror films often run screaming down the same well-traveled road: a white, middle-class family is set upon by a demon, who is subsequently vanquished by the unshakable power of white Christian faith. It’s a blueprint that The Exorcist established so well that few have bothered to alter it in any meaningful way. Into this stale subgenre comes writer-director Keith Thomas and his film The Vigil, a 90-minute chamber horror following Yakov, a young man who has abandoned his Orthodox Jewish community and lost his social safety net. Exiled and struggling with his new life, Yakov agrees to serve as a shomer, a spiritual role that involves staying with a deceased person’s body and reciting prayers the evening before their burial. While the job seems at first to be a godsend, the night quickly takes a dark turn, forcing him to confront the trauma that made him leave his community in the first place.”

Read our full analysis of The Vigil at In Review: Online

By mollyadamswrites

Molly Adams is a postgraduate and horror writer currently working on screenplays, articles, and a book on Jewish horror. If you'd like to keep updated on any of her work or new publications, head over to https://mollyadamswrites.wordpress.com

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